IGF 2023 Lightning Talk #60 Rights by Design: Privacy Engineering for the Rights of All

Time
Tuesday, 10th October, 2023 (09:20 UTC) - Tuesday, 10th October, 2023 (09:50 UTC)
Subtheme

Human Rights & Freedoms
Digital Technologies and Rights to Health
Non-discrimination in the Digital Space
Rights to Access and Information

European Cyber Conflict Research Initiative (ECCRI)
Catherine Easdon. European Cybersecurity Fellow at European Cyber Conflict Research Initiative (ECCRI); Internet Society Early Career Fellow; Security Engineer at Dynatrace. Participating as a member of the Technical Community. Regional group: Western European and Others Group (Austrian resident).  Ryan Payne. Researcher in Biometric Privacy at Queensland University of Technology; Ryan Payne Design (fashion consulting business); Internet Society Early Career Fellow. Participating as an academic. Regional group: Western European and Others Regional Group (Australian resident).

Speakers

Catherine Easdon. European Cybersecurity Fellow at European Cyber Conflict Research Initiative (ECCRI); Internet Society Early Career Fellow; Security Engineer at Dynatrace. Participating as a member of the Technical Community. Regional group: Western European and Others Group (Austrian resident). Ryan Payne. Researcher in Biometric Privacy at Queensland University of Technology; Ryan Payne Design (fashion consulting business); Internet Society Early Career Fellow. Participating as an academic. Regional group: Western European and Others Regional Group (Australian resident).

Onsite Moderator

Catherine Easdon

Online Moderator

Ryan Payne

Rapporteur

Catherine Easdon

SDGs

1.4
5.b
9.1
9.c

Targets: This talk is primarily aligned with SDG 9, in particular targets 9.1 and 9.c. Software now plays a critical role in providing access to and ensuring the quality, reliability, sustainability, and resilience of our global infrastructure. From our physical infrastructure (for water, energy, and transport, for example) through to our financial markets and even the political and social institutions that shape our societies, software determines what happens when and where information flows. It is therefore essential for digital inclusion that rights protections are built into software to ensure equitable access to infrastructure and services. In this talk, we will present how software can be built to meet the varying privacy needs of users around the world, and how such privacy protections lay the foundation for protecting users’ human rights. Without such protections, we cannot achieve universal access to the Internet (SDG 9.c) and equal rights of access to enabling technology and services (SDGs 1.4, 5.b) because Internet surveillance will continue to pose a threat to marginalized groups.

Format

20 minute presentation with interactive Q&A + 10 minute discussion

Duration (minutes)
30
Language
English
Description

This Lightning Talk introduces how rights protections can be built into software products by design, with a particular focus on privacy protections and why they lay the foundation for protecting users’ human rights and civil liberties. Such protections are a key building block in our efforts to achieve universal access to the Internet and equal rights of access to technology and services. We will discuss how the contextual privacy needs of users around the world differ and provide concrete examples of design choices and technical changes that can be made to protect these users. Incorporating ‘rights by design’ is an act of translation from the social, legal, and political realm into code and digital infrastructure. We therefore welcome participants from all backgrounds to join the discussion and contribute to our understanding of how we can best protect the rights of all in software. There will be a 20 minute presentation with interactive Q&A, followed by 10 minutes of discussion.

We will stream the session on Zoom so that online participants can watch the presentation and ask questions in the chat. If a projector or screen is available in the session room, then we will display the Zoom call so that on-site participants can see the online participants and follow the chat. Otherwise, we will encourage on-site participants to join the call on their phones or laptops to follow the chat (in addition to in-person participation). We plan to make the session as interactive as possible to encourage the participants to share their own diverse perspectives on privacy and rights protections. We will encourage questions during the presentation and each speaker (when acting as moderator) will ensure that the current speaker is aware of and promptly answers questions from both on-site and online participants. After the presentation, we will open up the floor for around 10 minutes of discussion and will encourage both on-site and online contributions.