IGF 2023 Town Hall #101 Education and generative AI

Issue(s)

Chat GPT, Generative AI, and Machine Learning

Round Table - 60 Min

Description

The release and mass use of generative AI in recent years has highlighted both the opportunities and challenges of these technologies for education. On the one hand, generative AI has the potential to democratize access to personalized learning and automate repetitive administrative tasks, liberating time for new creative ways to learn and teach. On the other hand, it raises concerns about privacy, bias, displacement of human educators and exclusion. This fear is particularly acute in the Global South. The round table town hall session shall explore these opportunities and perils and their public policy implications from the standpoint of four continents.

The round table town hall seeks to promote an informed debate on the use of generative artificial intelligence technologies (generative AI) in the educational field, based on:
. Mapping the national and international panorama of the impacts and potentials of the use of generative AI tools for educational processes, as well as presenting strategies for its practical application in the continuing education of students and teachers in compliance with the National Plan of Guidelines and Bases for Education and other regulatory frameworks related to digital education in Brazil and beyond.
. Promoting an informed and robust debate on the subject in which ways can be explored for the responsible use of these technologies by the different stakeholders.


The session will employ a two step approach: the first part is focused on thought-provoking inputs and the second on interactive and open discussions. In the first part, the dynamic will be an exchange between the panelists, focusing on the proposed questions from their regional perspectives.
In the second part, the floor will be opened to the audience. The audience members will be able to bring forward their perceptions regarding the future of inclusive uses of generative AI in education.

Throughout the whole session, there will be a digital mural where people may present their views of inclusive uses of generative AI in education. The moderator and the rapporteur will be in charge of cataloging the perceptions and insights noted starting with the 4 speakers and moving on with the speakers. In the end, we should have a cloud of words and map of perceptions.

Organizers

🔒BI Norwegian Business School
Celina Bottino, ITS Rio, CSO, South America
Christoph Lutz, Nordic Center for Internet and Society, BI Norwegian Business School, Europe
Elisabeth Sylvan, Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, CSO, North America
Samson Esayays, Nordic Center for Internet and Society, BI Norwegian Business School, Europe
Christian Perrone, ITS Rio, CSO, South America
Tainá Aguiar Junquilho, ITS Rio, CSO, South America

Speakers

Celina Bottino, ITS Rio, CSO, South America
Christoph Lutz, Nordic Center for Internet and Society, BI Norwegian Business School, Europe
Elisabeth Sylvan, Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, CSO, North America
Samson Esayays, Nordic Center for Internet and Society, BI Norwegian Business School, Europe
Christian Perrone, ITS Rio, CSO, South America
Tainá Aguiar Junquilho, ITS Rio, CSO, South America

Onsite Moderator

Christian Perrone, Head Law and GovTech, ITS Rio, CSO, South America

Online Moderator

Samson Esayas, Nordic Center for Internet and Society, BI Norwegian Business School, Academia, Europe

Rapporteur

Tainá Aguiar Junquilho, Senior Researcher Law and GovTech, ITS Rio

SDGs

5.1
5.a
5.b
5.c
8.10
8.3
8.5
8.6
8.8
8.a
8.b
16.7
17.16
17.17
17.18
17.19
17.6
17.7
17.8
17.9


Targets: AI can enable the accomplishment of various targets across all SDGs, but it may also inhibit many others. In this sense, the inclusion and diversity lenses that we will bring to this session are important aspects that should not be overlooked.

In this round table townhall session, we will discuss recent research, cases and developments how generative AI technologies may result in or reproduce discrimination and bias against women and minorities, being directly linked to the SDGs 5, 8 and 16.

In addition to discussions on a lack of diversity in datasets, we expect to touch base on another main issue of AI, namely the lack of gender, geographical, racial, and ethnic diversity in the AI workforce. Diversity – especially from an intersectional and holistic perspective that reflects the complex situatedness of everyone’s lived experience - should be one of the main principles supporting innovation and societal resilience, which are essential to achieve SDGs 8, 9,10 and 16 through AI design, development and implementation.

Finally, by bringing experts from four corners of the world to the table, we hope to shed light on how to strengthen global cooperation regarding SDGs 16 and 17, in the sense that AI is a global technology and the opportunities and impacts are international. The representation of participants from multiple continents allows for a rich comparative perspective that enables mutual learning.